Monthly Archives: June 2012

Let’s Test – in retrospect

What just happened? Was I just part of the first-ever European conference on context-driven software testing? It feels like it was only yesterday that was still thinking “this will never happen”, but it happened, and it’s already been over a month now since it did. So maybe it’s time for a quick (sort of) retrospective? Let’s see, where do I begin…?

Almost a year ago, I did something I rarely do. I made a promise. The reason I rarely make promises is because I’m lousy at following a plan and with many if not most promises, there’s planning involved… So making a promise would force me to both make a plan and then follow it. Impossible.

And yet, almost a year ago now, I found myself at the CAST conference in Seattle, standing in front of 200+ people (and another couple of hundred people listening in via webcast I’ve been told) and telling the audience that me and some other people from Sweden were going to put on a conference on context-driven testing in 2012 and that it would be just like CAST, only in Europe. And of course we had it all planned out and ready to be launched! Right…? Well… not… really…

At that point we didn’t have a date set, no venue contract in place, no program that we could market, no funding, no facilitators – heck, we didn’t even really have a proper project team. The people who had been discussing this up until now had only started talking about organizing a conference at the 2nd SWET workshop on exploratory testing in Sweden a couple of months earlier. In my mind, it was all still only on a “Yeah, that would be a neat thing to pull off! We should do that!” level of planning or committment from anyone. At least as far as I was concerned. The other guys might tell you that they had made up their minds long before this, but I don’t think I had.

Anyway, since I was elected (sort of) to go ahead and announce our “plan” (sort of), I guess this is the point were I made up my mind to be a part of what we later named “Let’s Test – The Context-Driven Way” and over the next couple of months we actually got a project team together and became more or less ready to take on what we had already promised (sort of) to do.

Fast forward a couple of months more. So now we have that committed team of 5 people in place, working from 5 different locations around the country (distributed teams, yay!). We have an awesome website, a Twitter account, a shared project Dropbox and some other boring back office stuff in place. The team members are all testers by trade, ready to crete a conference that is truely “by testers, for testers”. Done. What more do we need? Turns out, a conference program is pretty high up on the “must have” list for a conference. Yeah, we should get on that…

I think that this was the point where I started to realize just how much support this idea had out there in the context-driven testing community already. Scott Barber, Michael Bolton and Rob Sabourin were three of our earliest “big name” supporters who had heard our annoucement at CAST, and many testers from the different European testing communities were also cheering for the idea early on, offering support. A bunch of fabulous tutorial teachers and many fantastic testing thinkers and speakers from (literally) all over the world, who we never dreamed would come all the way to Sweden, also accepted our invitations early on. Our call for papers (that I at first feared wouldn’t get many submissions since we were a first-time conference) also rendered a superb yield of excellent proposals. So much so that it was almost impossible to only pick a limited number to put on the program.

So while I can say in retrospect that creating a conference program is no small task, it is a heck of a lot easier when you get as awesome a repsonse and support from the community as we’ve gotten throughout this past year. It did not go unnoticed folks!

After we got the program in place, I was still a bit nervous about the venue and residential conference format. Would people actually like to come to this relatively remote venue and stay there for three days and nights, while basically doing nothing else but talk about testing, or would they become bored and long for a night on the town? I had to remind myself of the reasons we decided to go down this route in the first place: CAST and SWET.

CAST is the annual “Conference of the Association for Sotware Testing” which uses a facilitated discussion format developed through the LAWST workshops. People who come to CAST usually leave saying it’s been one of their best conference experiences ever, in large parts due to (I believe) this format with facilitated discussions after each and every presentation. We borrowed this format for Let’s Test, and with the help of the Association for Software Testing (AST) we were able to bring in CAST head facilitator Paul Holland to offer facilitaiton training to a bunch of brilliant volunteers. Awesome.

SWET is the “Swedish Workshop on Exploratory Testing”, which is a small-scale peer workshop that also uses the LAWST style discussion format. But what makes this sort of gathering different from most regular conferences is that the people who come to the workshop all stay at the same location as the workshop is being held, for one or two consecutive days and nights. So after the workshop has concluded for the day, discussions still don’t stop. People at SWET stay up late and continue to share and debate ideas well into the night, at times using the sunrise as their only cue to get to bed. I believe one of the main reasons for this is… because they can. They don’t have to catch a bus or a cab to go back to their hotel(s) and when given the opportunity to stay up late and talk shop with other people who are as turned on by software testing as they are, they take it. We wanted to see this made possible for about ten times as many people as we usually see at SWET as well. Hence the residential format and extensive evening program at Let’s Test, which I believe is a fairly unusual if not unique format for a conference of this size. At least in our neck of the woods.

In the end, I personally think we were able to offer a nice blend of these two conference models that had inspired us. People weren’t forced to enter into discussions after sessions, but they were always able and encouraged to participate, and in a structured manner (great job all facilitators!). Also, people could choose to go to bed early and recharge their batteries after a long day of conferencing, or they could opt-in for either high energy test lab activities, or a more mellow and laid back art tour around the venue campus (to name but a couple of the well attended evening activities) before heading for the bar. I think I managed to get to bed at around 02.00 AM each night, but I know that some folks stayed up talking for a couple of hours beyond that each night too.

Wrapping up this little retrospective, I’d like to say thank you to our sponsors who, among other things, helped make the evening events such a well appreciated part of the conference experience and who all really engaged actively in the conference, which was something we as organizers really appreciated. Finally, a special shout out to the very professional Runö venue crew and kitchen staff who readily helped us out whenever we needed it. You made the execution of this event a total joy.

I’m very happy about how Let’s Test turned out. It exceeded my own expectations for sure. Judging by the feedback we saw on Twitter during the event, and in the blogosphere afterwards, I’d say it looks like most who attended were pretty ok with the experience as well. Check out the blog links we’ve gathered on the Let’s Test 2012 Recap page and judge for yourselves. Seriously, it’s been extremely rewarding to read through all these blog posts. Thank you for that.

Plans are already well underway for next year’s conference. We’re delighted that both James Bach and Johanna Rothman have signed on to be two of our keynote speakers and we’ll announce a call for proposals sometime after the summer for sure and I encourage all of you who sent something in last year to do so again. Oh, and you can sign up right now for Let’s Test 2013 and catch the advantageous first responder rate. A bunch of people already have, so you’ll be in good company.

One final thing… We know a good deal about what people liked at Let’s Test 2012, but no doubt there are also a few things that we can and should improve. Let us know.

It’s been a pleasure. See you all there next year I hope!

Thinking Visually

Today I finally got around to watching Alan Richardson’s STARonline talk “Thinking Visually In Software Testing” that has recently been published on YouTube for easy access (also embedded at the bottom of this post).

I’m always interested in learning new ways of visualizing information and communicate thoughts in effective ways and so Thinking Visually is a topic that’s right up my alley. Alan’s talk is well worth a watch/listen and if you don’t believe me, I took some quick notes while watching it to help you decide if it’s worth your time or not. (Hint: It is.)

Described in one sentence, the talk is about using models and diagrams to aid test planning and communication of the testing effort. It covers an explanation of what Alan means by “thinking visually” but it also describes the opposite of thinking visually and also contains a very amusing part with examples of how to best “trap” your thinking and how to best document your trapped thinking so that your readers will gain no value from reading your documentation. Hilarious. Also, as you listen to Alan’s examples of trapped thinking being presented in your average test plan or report, you will probably realize that you see this kind of documentation quite often.

I do recommend that you listen from the beginning of the talk, but if you want to hear what I’m talking right away, you can skip ahead to about 16:48 for a good laugh. That is, until you also realize that some of this stuff is something you yourself have been doing or maybe are still doing quite often. At least that’s what I realized. Alan suggests that we go through your own documents and read it with a sense of humor, which will help us spot these things more easily, and maybe also help us stop doing them.

But… going back to the beginning (how’s that for structure), one thing that Alan said early on was something that got me thinking about how I approach documentation and debriefings:

“I would rather see your thinking, than see what you think your thinking should look like.”

In other words, the way you are presenting your test strategy, test ideas or test results, should demonstrate that you’re putting more effort into the thought process than you are into the documentation process. So, focus on showing that you are thinking and that you are thinking about the testing task at hand, rather than presenting something that suggests you were focused on thinking: “How can I fill in this template”?

“If you don’t think in the first place. If you don’t have a model about what you’re going to do, your communication will be unclear, and you won’t convince, regardless of how well you fill in the template.”

I personally like to see more test plans focus on showing me that the tester is thinking, rather than focusing on exactly what they are thinking. Why? Well, test plans are usually born before testing starts, at a time when we know the least we’ll ever know about the thing we’re actually going to test. So if I’m one of your stakeholders and you show me a plan that tells me exactly what you’re going to do and that you have it all figured out… then the only thing I know for sure is what your testing will not be like, because no test plan fully escapes first contact with the product unscathed.

But, if you can show me that you are thinking actively, from many different angles, and that your thinking is open to a changing context, then I will feel more assured that you will do a good job once you get your hands on the product. I don’t want testers who can follow directions. I want testers who can think for themselves.

Ok, back to the presentation. Alan shares a few of his principles for how to approach documentation (somewhat paraphrased):

  • How little can you get away with?
  • Make the templates work for you, not the other way around
  • Put important information first. Make what’s important obvious
  • Summarize for the reader
  • Meet the reader’s needs

I’m running a bit long with this post, but it turns out that this was a very quotable talk, so I’ll leave you with a few “sound bites” that I took away from listening to this talk, that might trigger you to go and watch the whole 25 minutes or so of it yourself.

I learned that communication is not what I give, it’s what people take from what I present. So I have to help them take it in the way that I want […] to focus on what’s important.
– – –
When you create a mind map your default relationship is a parent/child decomposition, but there are other relationships in your model and you may need different visual models to draw that out.
– – –
Different tools support different styles of thinking. You get different value when you model your thought process in different tools.
– – –
Don’t think that you can get away without thinking.

EAST meetup #6

About 6 months ago, a few testing peers in Linköping, Sweden, started  a local competence network group that we named “EAST”. The name itself doesn’t mean anything, but suggests that we reside in the south east parts of Sweden and that we’re welcoming people from all around these parts, not just our little town.

The idea was to get people from different organizations and companies together to talk about test and to help each other learn more about testing by sharing knowledge and experiences with each other.

So this past Monday I attended the 6th meetup with the group. We’ve gone through a couple of meetings in the early stages where we got to know each other and talked about what we all do at our respective companies in terms of testing. By the 3rd or 4th meetup, we were starting to have more prepared themes for each meetup and this time we actually had two separate themes prepared.

First, we got to listen to Hanna Germundsson who presented a software testing thesis she’s working on, geared towards test processes and minimizing testing related risks. We got to ask questions and also had time for some open conversations in the group about the different questions Hanna presented. There will be follow ups to this one for sure. Haven’t seen that many software testing theses before. Very cool.

For the second part of the meetup, a couple of people talked about their experiences from the Let’s Test 2012 conference. While it’s of course fantastic to listen to people talking about this conference that I helped organize as an event in general, it was even more cool to listen to them describing specific take-aways and learnings from the different tutorials and sessions they attended. Check out the Let’s Test 2012 archives page for slides and other material related to the conference.

EAST will take a break over the summer, but we’ll be back in force this fall. If you live nearby and want to participate then I suggest you join the EAST LinkedIn group to stay in touch with news and announcements. Or follow @test_EAST on Twitter. Or both.

The little blog that could…

People sometimes start blogs, write a few posts and then they die away. I’ve taken a slightly different route. I started this blog in June of 2007 and has since then not written a single post. Not one… Until now… So now that I’ve decided to resurrect it 5 years later, I’m curious to see if I can keep it alive. I suspect that before to long I’ll start treating it like I treat my Twitter account. That is, long periods of nothing followed by days of super intense posting every now and then (usually when at workshops, conferences or other gatherings).

Some of you finding your way here already know me as a software tester. That’s good, because that’s what I intend to blog about here, so you don’t have to spend time getting to know me a second time around. If you know me as anything other than a software tester then you probably won’t get much out of following me through this forum. But I’ll still be your friend on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Entaggle or some other social media if you’d like. Or maybe even in *gasp* real life.

That’s it for now. First post done. There will be more to follow. Soon.

Or will there?