Report from CAST 2012

This year’s Conference of the Association for Software Testing (CAST) is now in the books. I’m returning home with a head full of semi-digested thoughts and impressions (as well as 273 photos in my camera and an undisclosed number of tax free items in my bag) and will briefly try to summarize a few of them here while I try to get back on Europe time.

The Trip
I’m writing this while on the train heading home on the last leg of this trip. Wow, San Jose sure is far away. Including all the trains, flights and layovers… I’d say it’s taken about 24 hours door-to-door, in each direction. That should tell you a bit about how far me and others are willing to go for solid discussions about testing (and I know there are people with even worse itineraries than that).

The Venue
I arrived at the venue a little over a day in advance in order to have some time to fight off that nasty 9 hour jet lag. Checked in to my room. Then immediately switched rooms since the previous guest had forgotten to bring his stuff out, though the hotel’s computer said that the room had been vacated. Still got my bug magnetism in working order apparently.

CAST was held at the Holiday Inn San Jose Airport this year. The place was nice enough. Nothing spectacular, but it did the job. The hotel food was decent and the coffee sucked as badly as ever. Which I expected it would, but… there were no coffee shops within a couple of miles as far as I could tell(!) I’m strongly considering bringing my own java the next time I leave Europe. It’s either that or I’ll have to start sleeping more, which just doesn’t work for me at any testing event.

The Program
I’m not going to comment much on the program itself since I helped put it together. Just wouldn’t make sense since I’d be too biased. I’m sure there will be a number of other CAST blog posts out there soon that will go more in depth (check through my blogroll down in the right hand sidebar for instance). I’ll just say that I got to attend a couple of cool talks on the first day of the conference. One of them was with Paul Holland who talked about his experiences with interviewing testers and the methods he’s been using successfully for the past 100+ interviews. Something I’m very interested in myself. I actually enjoy interviews, from both sides of the table.

The second day I got “stuck” (voluntarily) in a breakout room right after the first morning session. A breakout room is something we use at CAST when a discussion after a session takes too long and there are other speakers who need the room. Rather than stopping a good discussion, we move it to a different room and keep at it as long as it makes sense and the participants have the energy for it. Anyway, this particular breakout featured myself and two or three others who wanted to continue discussing with Cem Kaner after his presentation on Software Metrics. We kept at it up until lunch and after that I was kind of spent, so I opted to “help out” (a.k.a take up space) behind the registration desk for the rest of the day. Which was fun too!

The third day was made up of a number of full day tutorials. I didn’t participate in any of them though, so again you’ll have to check other blogs (or #CAST2012 on Twitter) to catch impressions from them.

Facilitation
CAST makes use of facilitated discussions after each session or keynote. At least one third of the allotted time for any speaker is reserved for discussions. This year I volunteered to facilitate a couple of sessions. I ended up facilitating a few talks in the Emerging Topics track (short talks) as well as a double session workshop. It was interesting, but I think I need to sign-up for more actual sessions next year to really get a good feel for it (Emerging Topics didn’t have a big audience when I was there and the workshop didn’t need much in way of facilitation).

San Jose / San Francisco
We also had time to see a little bit of both San Jose and San Francisco on this trip, which was nice. I only got to downtown San Jose on the Sunday leading up to the conference, so naturally things were a bit quiet. I guess it’s not like that every day of the week(?)

San Francisco turned out to be an interesting place with sharp contrasts. The Mission district, Market Square and Fisherman’s Wharf all had their own personalities and some good and bad things to them. Anyway, good food, nice drinks and good company together with a few other testers can make any place a nice place.

Summary
As with CAST every year, it’s the company of thoughtful, engaged testers that makes CAST great. If you treat it like any other conference and just go to the sessions and then go back to your room without engaging with the rest of the crowd at any point during the day (or night), then I’m afraid you’ll miss out on much of the Good Stuff. Instead, partake in hallway hangouts, late night testing games, informal discussions off in a corner, test your skill in the TestLab with James Lyndsay or join one of the AST’s SIG meetings. That’s when the real fun usually comes out for me. And this year was no exception.

3 Responses to Report from CAST 2012

  1. I think all software conferences should emulate Turku Agile Days and have a star barista on duty for the entire conference, with free cappuccinos!

    • That’s an idea we were tossing around for Let’s Test 2012 as well, and we’ll definitely revisit it for the 2013 edition. An open bar is not too shabby as an alternative either, but it does tend to have the opposite effect. 🙂

  2. Pingback: EAST meetup #7 | Let's Talk Testing

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