EAST meetup #7

Last night, EAST (the local testing community in Linköping) had its 7th “official” meetup (not counting summer pub crawls and the improvised restaurant meetup earlier this fall). A whopping 15 people from opted to prolong their workday by a few hours and gather to talk about testing in inside Ericsson’s facilities in Mjärdevi (hosting this time, thanks to Erik Brickarp). Here’s a short account of what went down.

First presentation of the night was me talking about the past summer’s CAST conference and my experiences from that. The main point of the presentation was to give people who didn’t know about CAST before an idea of what makes CAST different from “other conferences” and why it might be worth considering attending from a professional development standpoint. CAST is the conference of the Association for Software Testing. A non-profit organization with a community made up lots of cool people and thinking testers. That alone usually makes the conference worth attending. But, naturally I’m a bit biased.

If you want to know more about CAST, you can find some general information on the AST web and CAST 2012 in particular has been blogged about by several people, including myself.

Second presentation was from Victoria Jonsson and Jakob Bernhard who gave their experience report from the course “The Whole Team Approach to Agile Testing” with Janet Gregory that they had attended a couple of months ago in Gothenburg.

There were a couple of broad topics covered. All had a hint of the agile testing school to them, but from the presentation and discussions that followed, I got the impression that the “rules” had been delivered as good rather than best practices, with a refreshingly familiar touch of “it depends”. A couple of the main topics (as I understood them) were:

  • Test automation is mandatory for agile development
    • Gives more time for testers to do deeper manual testing and focus on what they do best (explore).
    • Having releases often is not possible without an automated regression test suite.
    • Think of automated tests as living documentation.
  • Acceptance Testing could/should drive development
    • Helps formulating the “why”.
    • [Comment from the room]: Through discussion, it also helps with clarifying what we mean by e.g. “log in” in a requirement like “User should be able to log in”.
  • Push tests “lower” and “earlier”
    • Aim to support the development instead of breaking the product [at least early on, was my interpretation].
    • [Discussion in the room]: This doesn’t mean that critical thinking has to be turned off while supporting the team. Instead of breaking the product, transfer the critical thinking elsewhere e.g. the requirements/user stories and analyze critically, asking “what if” questions.
    • Unit tests should take care of task level testing, Acceptance tests handles story level testing and GUI-tests should live on a feature level. [Personally, and that was also the reaction of some people in the room, this sounds a bit simplified. Might not be meant to be taken literally.]

There was also a discussion about test driven development and some suggestions of good practices came up, like for instance how testers on agile teams should start a sprint by discussing test ideas with the programmer(s), outlining the initial test plan for them. That way, the programmer(s) can use those ideas, together with their own unit tests, as checks to drive their design and potentially prevent both low and high level bugs in the process. In effect, this might also help the tester receive “working software” that is able to withstand more sapient exploratory testing and the discussion process itself also helps to remove confusion and assumptions surrounding the requirements that might differ between team members. Yep, communication is good.

All in all, a very pleasant meetup. If you’re tester working in the region (or if you’re willing to travel) and want to join for the next meetup, drop me an e-mail or comment here on the blog and I’ll provide information and give you a heads up when the next date is scheduled.

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