Peer conference awesomeness at SWETish

I spent this past weekend at a peer conference. This one marks my 5th peer conference, but it’s been a long while since I was at my 4th. In fact, it’s been four years since SWET4. Peer conferences are awesome though, as they let the participants really go deep and have thorough and meaningful conversations over one or more days in a small enough group that makes such discussions possible.

Ever since I moved to Linköping a few years ago, I had promised to do my part in organizing a local peer conference for the testing community in and around Linköping and this weekend we finally got that project off the ground! We decided to call this particular conference SWETish instead of making it another increment of the regular SWET. The reasons being that we wanted to keep participation first and foremost from within the local communities and the regular SWET conferences invite people from all over country, and also because we wanted to keep the theme broad and inclusive whereas SWET has already been through a fair number of iterations (SWET7 being the latest one) and we sort of didn’t want to break their set of more specific topics in exchange for a general one that has already been covered. Maybe next time we’ll put on “SWET8” though, if nobody in the Meetups.com group beats us to it (hint hint, wink wink, nudge nudge).

So, sort of but not quite a SWET conference i.e. SWETish (with its eponymous Twitter hashtag #SWETish).

The whole thing took place at the Vadstena Abbey Hotel, which is made up of a beautiful set of buildings, some dating back to the 12th, 13th and 14th century. From an organizer standpoint, I can certainly recommend this venue. Nice staff, cozy environment and above average food. And a nice historic atmosphere too of course. (Click the link in the tweet below for a couple of snapshots.)

When I sent out the initial invitations to this peer conference, I had my mind set on getting a total of 15 participants, as that seemed to be a good number of people to ensure that all speakers get plentiful of questions and that there would be a good mix of experiences and viewpoints, while at the same time not being too many people so that everybody gets to participate thoroughly and nobody is forced to sit quiet for too long. However, because a few people who had initially signed up couldn’t make it there in the end, we turned into a group of “only” 10 people. Turns out that’s an excellent number! Most if not all of us there agreed that the low number of participants helped create an environment where everybody got relaxed with each other really quickly which in turn helped when discussions and questions got more critical or pointed, without destroying the mood or productivity of those conversations.

Another pleasant surprise was that we only got through (almost) three presentations + Open Season (facilitated Q&A) during the conference (1,5 days). If memory serves, the average at my past peer conferences is four and sometimes we even start a fifth presentation and Q&A before time runs out. What I liked about us only getting through three is that that is a testament to how talkative and inquisitive the group was, even though 5 out of 10 participants were at their first ever peer conference! I facilitated the first presentation myself and so I can tell you that in that session alone we had 11 unique discussion threads (green cards) and 48 follow-up questions (yellow cards), plus quite a few legit red cards. So for those of you familiar with the k-cards facilitation system, you can tell that this wasn’t a quiet group who only wanted to listen to others speak. Which is great, because that’s the very thing that makes peer conferences so fantastically rewarding.


Apart from the facilitated LAWST-style sessions, we also spent 1 hour on Lightning Talks, to make sure that everyone got to have a few minutes of “stage time” to present something of their own choosing.

The evening was spent chatting around the dinner table, in the SPA and in smaller groups throughout the venue until well past midnight. And even though we’d spent a full day talking about testing, most of the conversations were still about testing! How awesome is that?

If you want to read more about what was actually said during the conference, I suggest you check out the Twitter hashtag feed, or read Erik Brickarp’s report that goes more into the content side of things. This blog post is/was more about evangelizing about the concept itself and provide some reflections from an organizer perspective. Maybe I should have mentioned that at the start? Oops.

A peer conference is made possible by the active participation of each and every member of the conference, and as such, credit for all resulting material, including this blog post, goes to the entire group. Namely, and in alphabetical order:

  • Agnetha Bennstam
  • Anders Elm
  • Anna Elmsjö
  • Björn Kinell
  • Erik Brickarp
  • Göran Bakken
  • Johan Jonasson
  • Kristian Randjelovic
  • Morgan Filipsson
  • Tim Jönsson

Thank you to all the participants, including the few of you who wanted to be there but couldn’t for reasons outside of your control. Next time! And thank you to my partners in crime in the organizing committee: Erik Brickarp, Anna Elmsjö and Björn Kinell.

There! You’ve now reached the end of my triennial blog post. See you in another three years! Actually, hopefully I’ll see you much sooner. The powerful dip in my blogging frequency has partly been due to the continuous deployment of new family members in recent years, which has forced me to cut back on more than one extracurricular activity.

Post below in the comments section if you have comments or questions about peer conferences, or want some help organizing one. I’d be happy to point you in the right direction!

One Response to Peer conference awesomeness at SWETish

  1. Brilliant post, you really captured the spirit of the conference. 🙂

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